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Should you disclose your pregnancy in a job interview?

On Behalf of | Jun 20, 2022 | Employment Law

Job hunting while pregnant presents a unique challenge. If you are not yet visibly pregnant, you may wonder whether it is appropriate to discuss your circumstances in a job interview.

Your first instinct may be to be completely honest with potential employers. However, there are some factors to consider before you proceed with the interview.

Pregnancy discrimination is against the law

Under federal law, employers may not discriminate against pregnant employees or job applicants. Even if you bring it up, the hiring manager can not legally consider it as a factor in the decision.

Bear in mind, however, that employers do not have to give a reason for not hiring someone, and most are not brazen enough to admit to rejecting an applicant for a discriminatory reason. If the employer decides not to hire you because you are pregnant, you may have a hard time proving discrimination.

You have no legal obligation to disclose your pregnancy

You do not have to reveal your pregnancy in a job interview, nor can the interviewer ask if you are pregnant or have children. In fact, a scrupulous hiring manager may not want to know this information due to legal risks.

Of course, a pregnancy can only remain a secret for so long. If you must discuss it sooner rather than later, consider waiting until you have received a formal job offer. It is unlikely that the employer will withdraw the offer after hearing your news, as doing so would be strong evidence of discrimination.

Ultimately, how and when you disclose your pregnancy is a personal decision. The law is on your side regardless of when you choose to share the information, but choosing the right time can offer you further protection from discrimination.